True Parents Symbolize the Hope of All People

Listen to the Richard Urban Show #81. What is the role of Rev. Sun Myung Moon in the current world situation?:

Cheon Seong Gyeong 341

What kind of people are True Parents? True Parents symbolize the hope of all people. They symbolize the absolute hope before fallen humankind. They are the fruit of history, center of the age, and the starting point for the future where human beings can be connected to this world where they are living today. (35-236, 1970.10.19)

Cheon Seong Gyeong 1200

The reason I created a newspaper company was to call together minorities. The countries where Native American peoples live are the countries of Rev. Moon’s cousins. Asia is the elder brother. The younger brother separated from there and came onto the American continent. This has to be indemnified. Unlike the ways of the Anglo-Sax-on people in America, Rev. Moon must restore this through indemnity, without shedding blood. Both the CIA and FBI say, “Rev. Moon, that’s causing us trouble!” No matter how alarming it may be, it is God’s will. God makes things happen that way. I make relationships with people through the will of God. People of all races are brothers and sisters. God doesn’t see colors. He is color blind.

Integrity

2. People of Integrity Fulfill Their Duty

 

Those who believe, and keep their duty, theirs are good tidings in the life of the world and in the Hereafter.
    Qur’an 10.63-64
 
All a gentleman can do in starting an enterprise is to leave behind a tradition which can be carried on. Heaven alone can grant success.
    Mencius I.B.14 (Confucianism)
 
The moral man conforms himself to his life circumstances; he does not desire anything outside his position. Finding himself in a position of wealth and honor, he lives as becomes one living in a position of wealth and honor. Finding himself in a position of poverty and humble circumstances, he lives as becomes one living in a position of poverty and humble circumstances. Finding himself in uncivilized countries, he lives as becomes one living in uncivilized countries. Finding himself in circumstances of danger and difficulty, he acts according to what is required of a man under such circumstances. In one word, the moral man can find himself in no situation in life in which he is not master of himself.
    In high position he does not domineer over his subordinates. In a subordinate position he does not court the favors of his superiors. He puts in order his own personal conduct and seeks nothing from others; hence he has no complaint to make. He complains not against God, nor rails against men.
    Thus it is that the moral man lives out the even tenor of his life, calmly waiting for the appointment of God, whereas the vulgar person takes to dangerous courses, expecting the uncertain chances of luck.
    Doctrine of the Mean 14 (Confucianism)
 
He who does not fulfill his duty is not respected by honest men. It is how he acts that reveals the nobility or baseness of a man and distinguishes the honest or the dishonest person; otherwise the ignoble would resemble the noble, and he who is devoid of honor would resemble a man of integrity; he who is unworthy would be deemed worthy and he who is depraved would be considered to be a man of virtue. If, under the pretext of duty, I adopt this unrighteous course, calculated to produce the confusion of social roles, and do acts not recognized by the scriptures, I should, renouncing good, have to reap evil only! What sensible man, able to discern what is just and unjust, would respect me in this world, if I behaved viciously and dishonorably?… Why should I, Rama, not fulfill the command of my father, who was a devotee of truth? Neither ambition, forgetfulness, nor pride would cause me to destroy the bridge of morality!
    Ramayana, Ayodhya Kanda 109 (Hinduism)
 
Tzu-kao, Duke of She, who was being sent on a mission to Ch’i, consulted Confucius. “The king is sending me on a very important mission. Ch’i will probably treat me with great honor but will be in no hurry to do anything more. Even a commoner cannot be forced to act, much less one of the feudal lords. I am very worried about it…”
     Confucius said, “In the world, there are two great decrees: one is fate and the other is duty. That a son should love his parent is fate—you cannot erase this from his heart. That a subject should serve his ruler is duty—there is no place he can go and be without his ruler, no place he can escape to between heaven and earth. These are called the great decrees. Therefore, to serve your parents and be content to follow them anywhere—this is the perfection of filial piety. To serve your ruler and be content to do anything for him—this is the peak of loyalty. And to serve your own mind so that sadness or joy do not sway or move it; to understand what you can do nothing about and be content with it as with fate—this is the perfection of virtue. As a subject and a son, you are bound to find things you cannot avoid. If you act in accordance with the state of affairs and forget about yourself, then what leisure will you have to love life and hate death?…
    “Just go along with things and let your mind move freely. Resign yourself to what cannot be avoided and nourish what is within you—this is best. What more do you have to do to fulfill your mission? Nothing is as good as following orders—that is how difficult it is!”
    Chuang Tzu 4 (Taoism)
 
 
 

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